What to Expect From Science Under Sail

Each Science Under Sail program can be customized to meet the needs of your classroom. However, each program follows a basic outline. Below you’ll find an example of how a Science Under Sail program is structured.

Welcome to Schooner Appledore!

Our Education Coordinator boards your bus to welcome teachers and to explain initial directions to the students. The students then leave the bus and head to the dock where the Captain and Crew Educators greet them and break them into pre-arranged small groups.

Each of our Educators is assigned to one of the groups and begins working with the students while still ashore. Here, the First Mate will review safety procedures and explain what everyone needs to know to make the Appledore experience a safe and comfortable one. Educators and students will then board the Appledore.

While Under Sail

Prior to your trip, teachers will review options and select specific experiences for the group. Some of the options include:

Sampling
If a module is selected that requires sampling, each group will use collection equipment based on the module selection. If no sampling is required, all students will immediately proceed into the Transit to the Bay Rotations.

Transit to the Bay Rotations

During the Saginaw River transit (for Bay City departures), students will be led by educators through a series of 3 rotations based on selections the teacher has made in advance.

During the transit to the lake from other ports, students will be led by educators through a series of 2 rotations based on selections the teacher has made in advance.

Raise the Sails!

The crew will engage the students in raising the sails. The teachers and chaperones are encouraged to participate as well. After the sails are set, BaySail educators will lead the group in a fun shanty sing-a-long.

Transit to Port Rotations

During the Bay City and Port Austin transits, students will be led by educators through a series of 3 additional rotations based on selections the teacher has made in advance. Tawas and Detroit transits include 2 additional rotations.

Whole Group Activity
Students will participate in a final whole group activity with the Education Coordinator to tie together the events of the day. Typically, this activity includes talking about aquatic food webs, bioaccumulation, watershed, or point/nonpoint source pollution effects on our local waterways.

Dock and Wave Goodbye

We hope you enjoyed your time with us. At the end of our journey together, you should have a better understanding of science and Michigan’s waterways. We look forward to sailing with you again.